Thursday, June 14, 2012

Errata

I won't name the magazine as I intend to take the medium-high road, but a national fly fishing magazine recently credited a photo of mine to an unknown person. I alerted the editorial staff (who I respect greatly), and was told a correction would be run. It wasn't. I talked to the staff and they said their requests fell on deaf ears. I e-mailed the publisher and the deafness continued.

I recently saw a photo-credit correction on Midcurrent, and it was handled with aplomb and courtesy. Anyone who works in the publishing industry understands that typos, errors, and miscellaneous mistakes will happen, even to the best (and are not the end of the world despite the beliefs of  internet hecklers). I have made my share. But running a correction on a miscredited photo is the right thing to do.

How should I handle this? Thus far, my stance has been to let bygones be bygones, but never contribute to this magazine again and talk shit about it (privately). It is a kind of a big deal, as I need to protect my intellectual property, but I want to be understanding and not get a reputation as a  pain-in-the-ass prima donna. And in theory, I'd like to contribute to this magazine again.

Thoughts? Has this happened to you? Do I have any recourse, or am I at the mercy of the publisher?

3 comments:

JGR said...

So you would like to, and not want to, contribute to the magazine again?

I've had entire articles outright poached before, and when I found them on the offending source I raised absolute hell. This included stalking the responsible people down on Facebook and bitching to them. They eventually took it down. I could give a rat's ass about them, sure it was a great site but I'm not making any money off of it.

So, I still don't have an answer for you. Just a rant, sorry. JGR

e.m.b. said...

Tough one, this. And as a librarian who studied intellectual property rights, I'm disappointed in the "deaf ears." Also, puzzled as to why the editorial staff does not have the power to get in print the correction. I think that in today's world intellectual property protection is more important than ever and more is at stake, too, because of how easy it is to rip off another person's work. The mistake of this magazine was probably an honest one...yet also is making the person they attributed it to look bad as well! As if they purposely ripped your work off. I'm a firm believer in "another go" and so I'd contact the editors once more (in a very un-prima-donnaish way, of course) ;) , you never know. As artists (writers/photographers, etc.) we cannot let our work be misrepresented. Yet, if that doesn't happen, I think your current stance is the best one...

Joshua Bergan said...

Thanks for the comments. Glad I'm not alone. Although I kind of wish I was.
All valid points, Erin. I am positive it was an honest mistake. Regardless...